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In This Issue
It Was A Year Unlike Any Other
Despite Volatile Season, Outlook Is Optimistic
After Record Drought, Texas Hopeful About 2012
Can We Do Anything About The Weather?
South Georgia Crop – Rough Start, Great Finish
Research Priorities Are Changing
Labor Issues Remain Crucial For Industry
Residual Herbicides Effective On N.C. Pigweed
Another Option For Producers – Conventional Cotton
Commodity Groups Want Fairness In Bill
Farm Bureau Unhappy With EPA
Asia Pacific Region – Key Market For U.S. Ag
BWCC Ginning Conference Features High-Tech Applications
California Producers Hurry To Finish Harvest
USDA Seeks Help For Arizona Rural Areas
FSA Begins Task Of County Committee Elections
California County Farm Bureaus Honored
CFBF Adds Field Rep To Staff
Web Poll: Conventional Back In The Mix
Cotton's Agenda
What Customers Want
Editor's Note
Industry Comments
Specialists Speaking
Industry News
Cotton Ginners Marketplace
My Turn: The Changing Landscape
ARCHIVES

How would you evaluate the 2011 cotton crop season?

By Tommy Horton
Editor
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Mike Quinn
Carolinas Cotton Growers, Garner, N.C.

Hurricane Irene is the big event that affected our cotton crop here in the Carolinas. It really stressed the plants for almost a 12-hour period. Following the hurricane, we had some unusually heavy rains about two weeks later. We lost some quality and about 250 pounds of yield. As we go into the 2012 season, there is still a lot of interest in cotton, but we need for prices to stay above a dollar if we hope to gain any additional cotton acreage.

In the Lower Southeast, cotton, corn and peanuts were absolutely spectacular. I’m not sure why, but if you had enough water and could keep the crop going, farmers made some surprising yields. The dryland cotton that was planted early and kept a stand also turned out pretty well. On the whole, I’d say this area had a good year. We might see a slight drop in cotton acres in 2012 because of the excellent peanut prices right now. However, I’m not anticipating that cotton will fall off too much. It may only be a 5 to 10 percent drop in overall acreage for cotton.


Ed Barnes
Cotton Incorporated, Cary, N.C.

From a U.S. standpoint, it was one of the most variable years that cotton has ever had. We had a crop failure in Texas but had a pretty decent year in the Carolinas, although the hurricane did affect some acreage on the coast. The one bright spot in all of this is that there is some anticipation about 2012 because of good prices. This is what will continue to encourage farmers as we look ahead.


Chris Breedlove
Ginner, Raymondville, Texas

If we had received two more rains this year, it would’ve been a bumper crop in the Rio Grande Valley. We feel pretty good about the crop season we had in 2011. Our farmers probably averaged around 600 pounds per acre. We had a few folks who produced two-bale cotton. Compared to what other parts of Texas endured, I’d say we were pretty fortunate in south Texas. Sure, we had good varieties that performed well. But what really made the difference was the continued success of the boll weevil eradication program. We are seeing big dividends from that program here and along the Coastal Bend.


Steve Brown
PhytoGen Seed, Tifton, Ga.

In the Lower Southeast, cotton, corn and peanuts were absolutely spectacular. I’m not sure why, but if you had enough water and could keep the crop going, farmers made some surprising yields. The dryland cotton that was planted early and kept a stand also turned out pretty well. On the whole, I’d say this area had a good year. We might see a slight drop in cotton acres in 2012 because of the excellent peanut prices right now. However, I’m not anticipating that cotton will fall off too much. It may only be a 5 to 10 percent drop in overall acreage for cotton.


Justin Cariker
Producer, Dundee, Miss.

We were flooded early and then had wind and sand in the Mississippi Delta during the last week of April. We wound up having to replant 1,100 acres of cotton. It was early June before we finished with the planting, but we made one of the best crops we’ve ever had. With these new varieties plus a great environment in the Mississippi Delta, we can grow cotton better than anything else. Cotton is our money crop. No doubt about it.

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