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In This Issue
It Was A Year Unlike Any Other
Despite Volatile Season, Outlook Is Optimistic
After Record Drought, Texas Hopeful About 2012
Can We Do Anything About The Weather?
South Georgia Crop – Rough Start, Great Finish
Research Priorities Are Changing
Labor Issues Remain Crucial For Industry
Residual Herbicides Effective On N.C. Pigweed
Another Option For Producers – Conventional Cotton
Commodity Groups Want Fairness In Bill
Farm Bureau Unhappy With EPA
Asia Pacific Region – Key Market For U.S. Ag
BWCC Ginning Conference Features High-Tech Applications
California Producers Hurry To Finish Harvest
USDA Seeks Help For Arizona Rural Areas
FSA Begins Task Of County Committee Elections
California County Farm Bureaus Honored
CFBF Adds Field Rep To Staff
Web Poll: Conventional Back In The Mix
Cotton's Agenda
What Customers Want
Editor's Note
Industry Comments
Specialists Speaking
Industry News
Cotton Ginners Marketplace
My Turn: The Changing Landscape
ARCHIVES

FSA Begins Task Of County Committee Elections

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Farm Service Agency (FSA) Admini-strator Bruce Nelson has announced that 2011 FSA county committee elections began last month, with USDA mailing ballots to all eligible voters. The deadline to return the ballots to local FSA offices is Dec. 5, 2011.

“The role and input of our county committee members is more vital than ever at a time when our country faces important choices regarding the funding and operation of our government,” says Nelson.

“New county committee members provide input and make important decisions on the local administration of disaster and conservation programs. With better participation in recent years, we have also seen promising increases in the number of women and minority candidates, helping to better represent the richness of American agriculture.”

County committee members are an important component of the operations of FSA and provide a link between the agricultural community and USDA.

Important Link To Farmers

Farmers and ranchers elected to county committees help deliver FSA programs at the local level, applying their knowledge and judgment to make decisions on commodity price support programs; conservation programs; incentive indemnity and disaster programs for some commodities; emergency programs and eligibility.

FSA committees operate within official regulations designed to carry out federal laws.

To be an eligible voter, farmers and ranchers must participate or cooperate in an FSA program. A person who is not of legal voting age, but supervises and conducts the farming operations of an entire farm may also be eligible to vote. Agricultural producers in each county submitted candidate nominations during the nomination period, which ended on Aug. 1.

Eligible voters who do not receive ballots in the coming week can obtain ballots from their local USDA Service Center. Dec. 5, 2011, is the last day for voters to submit ballots in person to local USDA Service Centers. Ballots returned by mail must also be postmarked no later than Dec. 5. Newly elected committee members and their alternates will take office Jan. 1, 2012.

Close to 7,700 FSA county committee members serve in the 2,244 FSA offices nationwide. Each committee consists of three to 11 members who serve three-year terms. Approximately one-third of county committee seats are up for election each year. More information on county committees, such as the new 2011 fact sheet and brochures, can easily be found at www.fsa.usda.gov/elections or at a local USDA Service Center.

Strong Ag Sector Is Crucial

The Obama Administration, with Agriculture Secretary Vilsack’s leadership, has worked tirelessly to strengthen rural America, implement the Farm Bill, maintain a strong farm safety net and create opportunities for America’s farmers and ranchers.

U.S. agriculture is currently experiencing one of its best years in decades thanks to the productivity, resiliency, and resourcefulness of its producers. Today, net farm income is at record levels while debt has been cut in half since the 1980s.

Overall, American agriculture supports 1 in 12 jobs in the United States and provides American consumers with 86 percent of the food they consume, while maintaining affordability and choice.

The Obama Administration has aggressively worked to expand export opportunities and reduce barriers to trade, helping to push agricultural exports to record levels in 2011 and beyond. Strong agricultural exports are a positive contribution to the U.S. trade balance, support nearly one million American jobs and boost economic growth.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write: USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20250-9410 or call (800) 795-3272 (voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD).

USDA contributed information for this article.

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