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Seed Decisions – Every Year Is Different
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California Farmers Want GPS Systems Protected
Consultants Conference Continues To Thrive
Under Armour, Cotton – A Special Partnership
California Farm Bureau Welcomes Trade Pacts
Managing Risk
Let's Get Back To Basics
Vilsack Issues Call For Young Farmers
Chinese Scientists Visit Georgia
U.S. Cotton Quality Continues To Improve
Landscape Has Changed For Varieties
Web Poll: Drought Affects Fall Burndown
Cotton's Agenda
Crop Insurance – An Important Tool
What Customers Want
Editor's Note
Specialist Speaking
Industry News
Cotton Ginners Marketplace
My Turn: In Search Of A ‘Normal Year’
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Chinese Scientists Visit Georgia

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China is a major supplier of food ingredients and products to the United States and Canada. However, food safety concerns for both Chinese and U.S. products have resulted in food recalls in recent years. To address these concerns, the University of Georgia held the fourth International Summit on Emerging Issues in Food Safety and Marketing.

The UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences hosted 10 scientists from China and one from Taiwan, as well as several UGA food experts and students, for the summit that is a partnership between UGA, Shanghai Acad-emy of Agricul-tural Sciences and Shanghai Ocean Univer-sity. Each year, this international summit is held at one of these three institutions.

“This program provides a catalyst for increased collaboration and exchange by providing a forum for researchers, students and stakeholders to exchange knowledge and ideas related to food safety, trade and policy issues,” says Ed Kanemasu, CAES assistant dean and director of global programs. “We envision new collaboration in training on food safety issues and new opportunities for student exchange.”

Mutual Problems Addressed

Food exports from China have surged since its entry into the World Trade Organization in 2001. However, defective labeling, contamination and poor food safety have caused concern and sparked the recall of some food products. The summit focused on food safety and trade to ensure that food safety issues don’t hinder future international trade.

Outbreaks of foodborne illnesses from fresh produce and ready-to-eat foods in the United States have led to new food safety laws, increased food-tracing technologies and greater scrutiny of imports.

Creating Relationships

The summit included discussions about new technology to decrease foodborne viruses and post-harvest quality techniques as well as pesticide applications and global marketing.

“Our economies are so intertwined that we must find ways to work together,” says Scott Angle, CAES dean and director. “This begins with relationships. While the immediate purpose of the meeting is to share information, the relationships we are creating are just as valuable.”

Next year, the annual international summit will be hosted by SHOU in Shanghai, when the university celebrates its 100-year anniversary.

The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences contributed this article for use in Cotton Farming.

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