Cotton Farming Peanut Grower Rice Farming CornSouth Soybean South  
spacer
topgraphic
HOME ARCHIVE ABOUT US CALENDAR LINKS SUBSCRIBE ADVERTISE CLASSIFIEDS COTTON GINNERS MARKETPLACE
In This Issue
Cotton – Charting New Waters
Increased Capacity Helps Texas Ginners
Cotton's Agenda: Don’t Miss Those Deadlines
Greenhouse Gas Debate Continues
Don’t Mess With West Texas...Varieties
Pigweed Hits North Alabama
Air Quality Rules Help Farmers
Ginning In The West Continues To Change
Calif. Ag Summit Focuses On Key Industry Issues
What Customers Want: Today’s Consumer Won’t Accept Poor Quality
Cotton Board: Enemy Becomes Friend
Missouri’s Parker Elected Chairman Of NCC For 2011
Editor's Note: Want Some Advice? Talk To A Farmer
Industry Comments
Web Poll: ‘Combo’ Approach For Weed Control
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: Don’t Wait Too Long To Schedule Gin Repairs
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: ‘Don’t Wait Too Late’
My Turn: A Fond Farewell
TCGA SECTION
TCGA Schedule of Events
President's Report
TCGA’s ‘Ginner of the Year’
Scholarship Awards Announced
Trust Continues Profitable Trend In 2010
Incoming TCGA President
Q&A with Jim Bradford
TCGA Exhibitors and Booth Numbers
CF / TCGA Alliance
Civic Center Map (PDF)
TCGA Staff
NFL Referee To Address PCG Annual Meeting
TCGA’s New Home: Overton Hotel
TCGA Officers/Directors
What To Do In Lubbock
Georgian To Lead National Cotton Ginners
ARCHIVES

Q & A with Jim Bradford

Jim Bradford, a Dimmitt, Texas, ginner,
is a former president of the Texas
Cotton Ginners’ Association.
print email
  Special Section: TCGA
 

TCGA Schedule of Events
President's Report
TCGA’s ‘Ginner of the Year’
Scholarship Awards Announced
Trust Continues Profitable Trend In 2010
Incoming TCGA President
Q&A with Jim Bradford
TCGA Exhibitors and Booth Numbers
Civic Center Map (PDF)
CF / TCGA Alliance
TCGA Staff
NFL Referee To Address PCG Annual Meeting
TCGA’s New Home: Overton Hotel
What To Do In Lubbock
Georgian To Lead National Cotton Ginners

Q. How do you feel about how the 2010 cotton crop turned out?

A. It was a good cotton crop, but it probably wasn’t as big as a lot of folks thought it would be. Some people think it was the cold spell that hurt us, and we certainly had a lot of heat in August and September. It pays to irrigate later in the year and maybe only once every five years. This would’ve been one of those years.

Q. Producers and ginners learn something every year. What exactly did they learn in 2010?

A. You can’t count your chickens until the crop is in. That’s the best way I can describe it. The hailstorm near Brownfield proved that point. The cotton strippers were parked at the end of the field ready to go. The storm hit, and the next day the cotton was gone...just like that. That’s about as bad as it gets.

Q. How does the long-range weather forecast look for this year?

A. We are awfully dry here on the High Plains. However, I’d rather for it to be wet in April and May instead of earlier in the year. That’s the one variable we have in Texas. We’re never quite sure about the weather and how much moisture we’ll receive. But, that’s just part of the deal when you grow cotton in this state.

Q. How do you feel about the price environment for cotton right now?

A. Cotton is still competing against $6 corn at this time. And, if our farmers have the water, they’ll still plant a lot of corn. However, I do think we’ll see an increase in cotton acres in this part of the state, and it’s all because of the attractive prices. I really do think it would be great if we saw farmers get back to that effective corn-cotton rotation. It helps the yields for both crops. The input costs for corn are going to be high, and that might convince some farmers to plant a little dryland cotton this year. Also, some of our continuous corn acreage might decrease in 2011.

Q. What about the ability of Texas gins to handle and process big crops?

A. With the gins we have now, we can process a lot of cotton early and fast. Between the gins I was associated with last year, we processed more than 245,000 bales. We’re hoping for more this year. We’re so optimistic up in Moore County that we’re expanding that gin. It’s a gamble, but if those farmers want to plant cotton, we want it ginned in a timely manner. We’re taking the risk with them.

Q. How important is technology at the cotton gin?

A. We’re just like farmers. Our input costs are increasing, and we have to balance the money we spend on technology to get us more output. That is the name of the game. We can’t just sling out any kind of cotton and put it into the bale. We have to answer to the farmers and mills. I don’t know of any gin that just sits back and says “everything is great.” There is always a new technology that can help us.

Q. What’s the take-away message for ginners today?

A. You can’t stick your head in the sand and keep on doing the same old thing. You have to be willing to make changes. I don’t know of any gin out there that isn’t spending money to increase efficiency.

Q. What’s the mood of farmers in your part of the High Plains?

A. I think everybody is pretty excited about these prices, but a farmer still has to be willing to step across that line and make changes. I had a farmer who had quit growing cotton for the last few years, and he told me that he’d get back to cotton “one of these days...maybe in another year or two.” It concerned me to hear him say that. I asked him who was going to gin his cotton when he came back. He quickly said, “You are.” I kidded with him and said, “How is that going to happen if everybody quits growing cotton?”

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
email
Tell a friend:
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


ad2

 

end