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In This Issue
Cotton – Charting New Waters
Increased Capacity Helps Texas Ginners
Cotton's Agenda: Don’t Miss Those Deadlines
Greenhouse Gas Debate Continues
Don’t Mess With West Texas...Varieties
Pigweed Hits North Alabama
Air Quality Rules Help Farmers
Ginning In The West Continues To Change
Calif. Ag Summit Focuses On Key Industry Issues
What Customers Want: Today’s Consumer Won’t Accept Poor Quality
Cotton Board: Enemy Becomes Friend
Missouri’s Parker Elected Chairman Of NCC For 2011
Editor's Note: Want Some Advice? Talk To A Farmer
Industry Comments
Web Poll: ‘Combo’ Approach For Weed Control
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: Don’t Wait Too Long To Schedule Gin Repairs
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: ‘Don’t Wait Too Late’
My Turn: A Fond Farewell
TCGA SECTION
TCGA Schedule of Events
President's Report
TCGA’s ‘Ginner of the Year’
Scholarship Awards Announced
Trust Continues Profitable Trend In 2010
Incoming TCGA President
Q&A with Jim Bradford
TCGA Exhibitors and Booth Numbers
CF / TCGA Alliance
Civic Center Map (PDF)
TCGA Staff
NFL Referee To Address PCG Annual Meeting
TCGA’s New Home: Overton Hotel
TCGA Officers/Directors
What To Do In Lubbock
Georgian To Lead National Cotton Ginners
ARCHIVES

President's Report: Jerry Multer

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  Special Section: TCGA
 

TCGA Schedule of Events
President's Report
TCGA’s ‘Ginner of the Year’
Scholarship Awards Announced
Trust Continues Profitable Trend In 2010
Incoming TCGA President
Q&A with Jim Bradford
TCGA Exhibitors and Booth Numbers
Civic Center Map (PDF)
CF / TCGA Alliance
TCGA Staff
NFL Referee To Address PCG Annual Meeting
TCGA’s New Home: Overton Hotel
What To Do In Lubbock
Georgian To Lead National Cotton Ginners


If Jerry Multer could have planned his year as Texas Cotton Ginners’ Association president, it couldn’t have gone any smoother. No controversial issues confronted the organization, and the momentum continued on numerous projects.

Multer, who has managed the Wall Co-op Gin in Wall, Texas, for the past 16 years, made the transition to the presidency after spending the previous two years as secretary and vice president.

“Because there weren’t any serious issues in 2010, we concentrated on the aggregation program, electrical rates and internship programs,” he says.

Safety has always been a major priority in Multer’s career as a ginner, and that’s why he took particular satisfaction in attending all of the Texas Cotton Ginners Trust programs last year. The Trust’s success may be one of the main reasons for increased statewide support for TCGA. That fact, coupled with the efforts of staffer Kelley Green on environmental and air quality issues, has solidified the organization. “Between the Trust and our efforts on the regulatory front with Kelley, I think our work continues to be significant,” says Multer.

While the membership statistic continues to be strong, it is worth noting again that TCGA h a s achieved a 99 percent support level across the state. That translates into about 234 out of 238 gins in Texas being members of TCGA.

One of the ongoing success stories, according to Multer, is how TCGA continues to monitor the Environmental Protection Agency’s activities and be prepared to minimize any impact on gins.

In 2009, TCGA president Keith Mixon’s tenure was a bit different and was highlighted by a favorable ruling from the Labor Department over how overtime exemption is supposed to be interpreted. When TCGA, through NCGA, hired noted labor attorney Ann Margaret Pointer, it was able to present an impressive case.

“We didn’t have to deal with anything quite that big,” says Multer. “But we did have continuity with our other ongoing projects.”

Any review of the 2010 season has to include the dramatic price increase for cotton and the ramifications for the Texas cotton industry. Multer is hoping that the price surge won’t be a “flash in the pan” and will continue for some time. Most economists believe that the supply and demand fundamentals are in place for strong cotton prices for at least two more years.

“If the price were to stay at these high levels, it would certainly help our farmers and make it a lot better for everyone,” says Multer.

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