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In This Issue
Cotton – Charting New Waters
Increased Capacity Helps Texas Ginners
Cotton's Agenda: Don’t Miss Those Deadlines
Greenhouse Gas Debate Continues
Don’t Mess With West Texas...Varieties
Pigweed Hits North Alabama
Air Quality Rules Help Farmers
Ginning In The West Continues To Change
Calif. Ag Summit Focuses On Key Industry Issues
What Customers Want: Today’s Consumer Won’t Accept Poor Quality
Cotton Board: Enemy Becomes Friend
Missouri’s Parker Elected Chairman Of NCC For 2011
Editor's Note: Want Some Advice? Talk To A Farmer
Industry Comments
Web Poll: ‘Combo’ Approach For Weed Control
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: Don’t Wait Too Long To Schedule Gin Repairs
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: ‘Don’t Wait Too Late’
My Turn: A Fond Farewell
TCGA SECTION
TCGA Schedule of Events
President's Report
TCGA’s ‘Ginner of the Year’
Scholarship Awards Announced
Trust Continues Profitable Trend In 2010
Incoming TCGA President
Q&A with Jim Bradford
TCGA Exhibitors and Booth Numbers
CF / TCGA Alliance
Civic Center Map (PDF)
TCGA Staff
NFL Referee To Address PCG Annual Meeting
TCGA’s New Home: Overton Hotel
TCGA Officers/Directors
What To Do In Lubbock
Georgian To Lead National Cotton Ginners
ARCHIVES

Greenhouse Gas Debate Continues

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The U.S. Department of Agriculture has published a notice in the Federal Register seeking public comment on a new effort to provide tools that will help farmers, ranchers and forest land owners to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG) footprint of their operations.

The project will bring together scientific experts from across USDA, other Federal agencies and U.S. research institutions in order to develop consistent metrics for estimating changes in GHG emissions and carbon sequestration for the country’s farm, ranch and forest operations.

The goal is that the new tools will provide a comprehensive, transparent approach to calculating changes in GHG emissions across all management activities within a farm, ranch or forest operation. The guidance will include ways to estimate the GHG benefit of new technologies, such as methane digesters and nitrification inhibitors (which help fertilizer stay within the root zone).

USDA has been a leader in conducting regional and national GHG inventories; and its scientists have a history of collaborative research with universities to advance the scientific understanding of agriculture’s role in helping to mitigate climate change.

GHG Data Sought

The current effort aims to capture the state of the science and to provide user-friendly tools and guidance to farmers, ranchers and forest landowners who are interested in quantifying the GHG benefits of management changes within their operation.

The guidance and tools will also be useful to USDA in assessing the ecosystem services benefits of conservation programs and initiatives.

USDA contributed information for this article.



Farm Bureau Officials Complain About EPA Regulations

America’s farmers and ranchers will receive a “double economic jolt” from the Environmental Protection Agency’s regulation of greenhouse gases, the American Farm Bureau Federation has told a House subcommittee.

Philip Nelson, president of the Illinois Farm Bureau, testified on behalf of AFBF before the House Energy and Commerce subcommittee on Energy and Power.

“First, any costs incurred by utilities, refiners, manufacturers and other large emitters to comply with GHG regulatory requirements will be passed on to the consumers of those products, including farmers and ranchers,” Nelson explains.

“As a result, our nation’s farmers and ranchers will have higher input costs, namely fuel and energy costs, to grow food, fiber and fuel for our nation and the world.”

The Illinois farm leader says EPA’s regulations could increase fertilizer prices for farmers because the rules outline a larger role for natural gas, replacing coal and other fossil fuels.

American Farm Bureau provided information for this article.
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