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In This Issue
Tough Farmers
Record Prices Excite Texas Ginners
Multi-Option Program Begins At Burndown
Big Crowds Expected At California Show
USDA Increases Assistance To Military
Cottonseed Oil In Beignets?
New Calif. Ag Leader Earns Praise
Cotton's Agenda: Raising Beltway Awareness
What Customers Want: Fabric Quality Helps Deliver Best Garments
Farm Bureau Wants Safety Net
Value Of Foliar Feeding And Petiole Testing
Upbeat Mood Evident At BWCC In Atlanta
Mark Nemec — 2010 CCOY winner
California Ag Tries To Adjust To Budget Cuts
Mid-South Gin Show
Clinton, Stabenow To Speak At Ag Forum
Editor's Note: Memorable Road Trip To North Alabama
Industry Comments
Web Poll: Potential Effects Of 2010 Elections
Viewpoint: How Cotton Cleaned Up Its Act
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: BWCC Ginning Conference Discusses ‘Capacity Robbers’
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: Variety Selection, Residuals Are Key
My Turn: A Year Of Changes
ARCHIVES

BWCC Ginning Conference Discusses
‘Capacity Robbers’

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During the Beltwide Cotton Conferences in Atlanta, a panel discussion on capacity robbers was lead by Ross Rutherford and John Fabian and featured prominent ginners – Wes Morgan, Craig Huckaby, Richard Kelly and David Blakemore – from across the Cotton Belt. Capacity robbers are those events that limit the hourly, daily and weekly production of the gin, costing productivity and money. This can manifest itself in many different forms – mechanical and pneumatic design, electrical and personnel management. In this discussion, ginners identified several factors that rob capacity and reduce ginning efficiencies, which included: poor maintenance, choke points, air system design, excess moisture and personnel management.

Inconsistent Feed Rates – Consistent feed to the gin stands was identified as one of the most challenging problems. Many gins did away with feeders and used the module feeder to control flow, but with the different shaped round modules, feed control is essential in keeping all gin stands loaded. Gin stand monitors can help to identify situations where stands are not getting uniform feeds.

It was noted that one gin was able to take a 28-bale per hour (bph) average to a 38 bph with updated feed control and air handling systems.

Too High Or Too Low Moisture – All ginners know that properly conditioned modules can make any gin run smoothly, but high moisture can bring a gin’s capacity to its knees.  Moisture control is the key to smooth operation, utilizing moisture sensing technology, state-of the-art burner controls and dryers and moisture restoration systems.

Work closely with your farmers in module construction and protection from moisture. Many ginners have noted that the new round modules provide more consistent feed to the gin, increasing average capacity.

Technology Is Your Friend - Each of the panelists identified new technology that improved ginning capacity and reduced down time. This includes gin stand controls, automated bale strapping systems and computer data management and acquisition for payroll, employee records, downtime logging and maintenance records.

In summary, gin managers need to identify capacity robbers by documenting downtime and use off season to correct problems and maximize efficiencies

– Thomas D. Valco, USDA Cotton Technology Transfer. For additional information, go to http://msa.ars.usda.gov/gintech. Contact Valco in Stoneville, Miss., at thomas.valco@ars.usda.gov via email or call (662) 686-5255.

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