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In This Issue
Can The Perfect Storm Continue In 2011?
Price, Price & Price
SE Leaders Hoping Momentum Continues
Young Miss. Producer Has His Own Style
Better Climate Being Forecast For Trade Issues
Early Rains Helped Agricenter’s ‘10 Crop
Arkansas To Release New Variety
Gillon Excited About Returning To Industry
Cotton's Agenda: U.S. Cotton Capitalizing
Cotton Board: Knowing When To Quit
What Customers Want: Cotton Quality Can’t Be Ignored At Retail Level
Western Producers Need Specialized Varieties
Companies Help In War On Weeds
PCG’s Cottonseed Insurance Now Offered
Deltapine Launches Two New Varieties
California Farmers Working On Water Quality
Publisher's Note: Cotton’s Mission: Exceed Expectations
Editor's Note: Industry's Enthusiasm Hard To Contain This Year
Industry Comments
Web Poll: Reaction To Ag Apps For Cell Phones
Viewpoint: Want Cotton Quality? Go To Texas
Specialists Speaking
Cotton Ginners Marketplace: Know Your Ginning Costs: The Key To Survival
Industry News
Cotton Consultants Corner: Cotton Farming Never Stops
My Turn: Cotton People Won’t Quit
ARCHIVES

Arkansas To Release New Variety

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A limited quantity of seed of a high yielding, high quality, non-transgenic cotton variety will be sold directly to producers by the University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture for planting in 2011, according to Mark Cochran, the Division’s associate vice president for research and director of the Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station.

The new variety, UA 48, “sets a new standard for fiber quality in upland cotton,” Cochran says. “We are offering UA 48 for licensure by a commercial seed company, but while that process is underway, we believe farmers will benefit from direct marketing.”

To protect the rights of a future licensee, producers will not be allowed to save harvested seed for planting, he adds. Patent and plant variety protection applications are pending.

“In performance tests in Arkansas and four other states, UA 48 has demonstrated a rare combination of early maturity, superior fiber quality and high yield potential,” he says.

A limited quantity of 50-pound bags of UA 48 will be sold at $100 per bag. Orders may be placed by contacting Rheta Pryor at (479) 575-8426 (rpryor@uark.edu), Arkansas Crop Variety Improvement Program, 1091 W. Cassatt Street, Fayetteville, Ark., 72704. Seed will be treated with Maxim/Apron/Systhane40.

Lower Costs Involved

Tom Barber, the Division’s Extension cotton specialist, says UA 48 seed can be planted at a cost of about $20 per acre compared to $100 per acre for transgenic varieties.

UA 48 provides a high yield, lower cost option for producers who have infestations of glyphosate-resistant weeds, Barber says. In those fields, the standard treatment of glyphosate (typically Roundup) with a transgenic variety has to be supplemented with additional herbicides to control resistant weeds. With a non-transgenic variety, no glyphosate would be applied.

UA 48 is a good choice for producers who can manage it for early maturity and implement conventional weed and pest control programs, Barber says. Early maturity makes it best adapted for the shorter growing season from just south of I-40 to the north.

UA 48 performance test results, an order form and other details are online at http://aaes.uark.edu/UA48.html. Seed quality information will be posted when available.

The University of Arkansas contributed information for this article.

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